blog-IMG_7820Having heard that the kingfishers were still in their nest, I ventured back up the hill in what can only be described as crap weather. It was windy and cold, and the cloud was so low that when we made it to the nest we had the clouds swirling around us in the wind.  I truly must be mad to do this especially when I know that most of the time spent there would be just waiting for something to happen. blog-IMG_7847We (my trusty assistant and I) spent three hours sitting in the cold and eventually left just as the sun was breaking through and the wind stopping.  Perhaps I timed it wrong but I don’t think so. blog-IMG_7783The kingfisher was only feeding once every couple of hours and as she had just been before we left, we could have ended up waiting longer for nothing.  Both times that I witnessed feeding were very quick. She flies in fast and silent and lands on the fence. She waited a few minutes there the first time to check out if I was a threat, then zoomed in and out to the nest and was gone. blog-IMG_7827 She is so quiet that if you are not actually watching, you will miss it.  The second time she came was as I was packing up to go. I was cold and had decided enough was enough. I stood up, adjusted the height of the monopod ‘just in case’ and turned around to see her looking at me. blog-IMG_7857 It was like she was waiting for me to be ready because as soon as I focused the camera she headed to the nest.  I had just seconds to fire off the shutter and she was gone. blog-IMG_7868  blog-IMG_7873a

1 Response Comment

  • LynleyFebruary 23, 2014 at 10:29 am

    I’m glad you were so well rewarded for being out in those hideous conditions. You could put together a book about the Kingfishers in a similar vein to Meg Lipscombe’s one on the Tuis nesting in her garden, illustrated by her fantastic photos. Your series of photos and words put together a great story.

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