Red Crowned Kakariki

One of New Zealand’s endemic birds, the Kakariki is a stunning bright green colour.  Kakariki means green in Māori language. Kakariki are rare on the two main islands of New Zealand now, but can be found on pest free islands.  Thanks to a relocation programme in 2010, they can now also be found in Zealandia and some of the Wellington Region.

Red Crowned Kakariki

I spent a few hours watching and photographing the Kakariki at Zealandia yesterday and was rewarded with some very cheeky birds stopping just long enough for me to get these images.  The light was coming and going but patience won out and I got the shots I was after.

Red Crowned Kakariki

A big thank you to the other photographer and her ingenious trick of the day – one I won’t forget and will be sure to try on my next visit to the Kakariki.  It certainly helped with getting these images.

Red Crowned Kakariki

We had an interesting discussion about the benefits in shooting in raw versus jpg.  At the time I don’t think she fully understood the difference and saw the raw processing as modifying the image.  Afterwards I thought of how I could have made it easier to understand.  The raw image is like the film negative, the jpg is the print.  Once the image is printed there is little that can be done to improve it – not so with the negative

Red Crowned Kakariki

If you are reading this blog then I hope you give it a try when you get your laptop, because it seems such a waste to limit yourself and your photography so much when you are using such great equipment.

Red Crowned Kakariki

Red Crowned Kakariki

1 Response Comment

  • MelissaJuly 1, 2015 at 1:04 pm

    Sorry I have to comment on this too, the Kakariki are so much fun to watch! I love it how they fly straight at you if you’re standing on the pathway. I often go to Zealandia as soon as they open and head straight up to the Kakariki feeders while there’s still Millet around and they are having their breakfast. Totally agree with you on Raw vs JPEG, especially at Zealandia, lots of the best places are the darkest places (Hihi feeders especially), so you can afford to underexpose to get a faster shutter speed )and a non-blurry bird) and then lighten in RAW processing. 🙂 Lovely photos again!

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